Welcome to Part 0 of my tour through ASP.NET 4.0. Today we're looking at installing VS2010 and .NET 4, where to get it and some basic options to consider once it has installed. The Release Candidate of VS2010 and .NET 4.0 was released yesterday and if you're lucky enough to have access to an MSDN subscription and the bandwidth to download it, you'll see that Visual Studio is available in several flavours in your download area. For non-MSDN subscribers, you can follow the links to download things from here. There are certainly plenty of options, although the selection is somewhat reduced from VS2008.

  • Express Editions - these are the cut down (but crucially not crippled) versions of Visual Studio available for free in perpetuity on the web.
  • Professional Edition - the standard, standalone version of Visual Studio that supports programming in all languages for all platforms. (with 50hr of Azure cloud computing)
  • Premium Edition - Professional edition plus the majority of features found in VS2008 Team Developer edition - integration with Team Foundation Server, database support, code coverage, more advanced testing tools etc. (with 100hrs of Azure cloud computing)
  • Ultimate - the complete Team Suite edition of VS2010. Premium edition plus more enhanced tools including UML and architecture tools, database admin, load testing etc. (with 250hrs of Azure cloud computing)

For a complete side by side feature comparison chart, go here.

You can also download the full .NET 4.0 RC Framework and .NET 4.0 RC Client Profile in x86 and x64 varieties if you so wish for installation on a test server or the like. Note that the Client Profile is the offline installer - the bootstrapper and the full installer - rather than just the bootstrapper. For more information on the difference between the two, have a read of Mr Scott's guide to 'SmallestDotNet'.

N.B. There is no x64 version of VS2010 and here are the arguments why.

Uninstall .NET 4 Beta 2 First!

.NET 4.0 is a side-by side release. That is, it includes a brand new set of base class libraries on top of which ASP.NET, WPF, WCF and the rest of the .NET framework libraries sit. It will install and co-exist peacefully with .NET 2.0 or .NET 1.x. Likewise VS2010 will co-exist happily with VS2008 and VS2005. However, you DO still need to uninstall any previous versions of VS2010 and .NET 4.0 before you start with the RC.

For reference, the build numbers for .NET v4 are as follows

  • CTP : 4.0.11001
  • Beta 1 : 4.0.20506
  • Beta 2 : 4.0.21006
  • RC : 4.0.30128

The build numbers for VS2010 are

  • CTP : 10.0.11001
  • Beta 1 : 10.0.20506
  • Beta 2 : 10.0.21006
  • RC : 10.0.30128

Check through your Programs and Features control panel. Sorting by Version helps a bit. If you uninstall the main Visual Studio entry, you'll only need to uninstall the Visual Studio Tools for Office Runtime as well of those items ringed below.

![1_UninstallVS2010](/content/images/2018/04/1_UninstallVS2010.jpg)

You'll also need to uninstall earlier versions of both the full .NET framework and the Client Profile if any are installed. Both uninstallations will require a restart.

![2_UninstallDotNET4](/content/images/2018/04/2_UninstallDotNET4.jpg)

And Finally, To Install VS2010

A couple of points to start with from the VS2010 Release Notes

  • Installation only works on a non-bitlocked drive.
  • Installation does not work in Program Compatibility Mode.

If you've installed VS2010 before, and given you're installing a release candidate, I'm guessing you have, run the installer and after a couple of screens where it says hi and asks you to accept the usual Microsoft Pre-release software license terms, you'll get to choose between a full or a custom installation. The screen for the latter is less cluttered than previous incarnations have been.

![3_CustomInstallScreen](/content/images/2018/04/3_CustomInstallScreen.jpg)

Office Development items have been refactored into one checkbox rather than hiding as an option under each language as in the VS2008 install screen. Visual F# becomes a first class custom option too. Once you've pressed install, go and have make a cup of coffee. There are some 30+ individual items to install based on what options you choose in the dialog above. You'll be told to restart your system after the .NET Framework has installed as well.

![4_TheList](/content/images/2018/04/4_TheList.jpg)

Once installation has finished, you'll also need to set up what documentation you want installed locally. Click 'Install Documentation' to start up the new Help Library Manager. The Manager splits available documentation in various categories for installation. The .NET Framework docs are the heaviest at just over 400MB. Click Add against any topic you'd like to have available offline and then click Update to install it all.

![5_HelpManagerChoices](/content/images/2018/04/5_HelpManagerChoices.jpg)

The eagle-eyed will notice a settings option in top-right of the manager dialog. Currently this allows you to choose whether the help system should use local or online help by default before falling back to the other if the desired topic is not found.

![6_HelpManagerSettings](/content/images/2018/04/6_HelpManagerSettings.jpg)

Once help has installed, you're done and ready to get started. Happy coding!