I wish I could articulate this better. Ghost in the Shell, my favourite film of all time, was finally released on a UK-playable blu-ray disc this week. However, the main feature is an upgraded version of the film, featuring 

  • Some cell animation scenes with CGI or underlaid some scenes with new CGI backgrounds
  • Completely re-recorded the soundtrack in 6.1
  • Rewritten some of the English subtitles – for the better I might add.

Hi-Def Digest had this to say about the release. And while I think there are some definite improvements in the new version – subtitles and audio stand out for instance – I have one major gripe with this release. All I wanted from a GitS Blu-ray release was a transfer to 1080p with the some loving attention to detail that was clearly lavished upon the new version, rather than the careless, jaggy-prone ‘original as a bonus’ included on the disc.

That’s not to say that the upgrade presents a ‘Lucassed’ version – that would imply that the film itself has been ruined somehow in plot or action. It hasn’t, but it hasn’t been improved either. And I genuinely wish that I didn’t now have to resort to having the TV upscale my original DVD copy rather than watching it on the new bluray.

Sigh.

The ironic thing is that if you fully take the ‘you’ve Lucassed it’ view, you’ve actually rejected a core tenet of the film which is that entities should embrace their ability to adapt and change and recreate themselves in forms that derive from but are not the same as the original – exactly as GitS2.0 has done.